Booking.com: improving conversion with best practice persuasive design

Persuasive design is something that has been around for many many years, not least in the way high street stores and supermarkets lay out their stores to encourage and entice customers to buy as they arrive and walk around. In the online world, PET (persuasion, emotion, trust) is an approach that was pioneered by Human Factors International, and alongside usability and user experience, designing with persuasion in mind is an extremely powerful approach to positively impact on conversion rates.

Author Paul Rouke, a consultant and trainer in usability & conversion optimisation, talks about Booking.com and the integration of persuasion in its design, content and layout. He also gives some valuable pointers on best practice persuasive design and general usability issues.

Read the full article: Booking.com: improving conversion with best practice persuasive design

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3 responses to “Booking.com: improving conversion with best practice persuasive design”

  1. Paul Rouke says

    Thanks for your reference to my post Paul, much appreciated. I’ll soon be publishing another article on major behavioural traits of men when shopping online, so look out for that.

    Thanks again.

    Paul


  2. Hi Paul,

    It’s a great article and a perfect example of what people can find in my list of resources. Your follow up article will undoubtedly be published as well. Keep us posted!

  3. Boquete Hotel says

    Great article. I have been using Booking.com since I opened my two hotels 4 months ago and I have been extremely pleased with the resultsas 95% of my bookings come from them. I know I should try hard not to rely so much on one OTA, but the fact is the other just have not delivered.

    I am constantly checking my listing on Booking and comparing the Last Booking ___ hours ago with my actual booking information. It is always spot on so people who think this information is false and used only to attract new bookings are wrong.

    I do find it strange though that every hotel in my market always displays the same number of people “looking at their hotel”.

    I doubt this is correct, though I can’t prove it.

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